Tectonics Research

Geology faculty and students

How does the earth move?

People

Dr. Richard Abbott (emeritus) does work reconstructing the tectonic and metamorphic history of ultra high pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks in the Dominican Republic, and blueschist-greenschist facies rocks in Jamaica.

Dr. Scott Marshall is most interested in better understanding the physics that governs how faults work. He uses traditional geologic field techniques to gather data detailng geologic structures, and then uses this field data to create three-dimensional numerical models that simulate the physics of complex geologic systems.

Dr. Gabe Casale interests are in the complex interplay between contemporaneous shortening and extension in active mountain belts from a field structural geology perspective. His research is centered around the Eocene-present tectonic evolution of the Adria continental block as it is consumed beneath Eurasia and the Apennines.

Dr. Jamie Levine works on high-grade metamorphic systems on scales from centimeters to kilometers, with work that analyzes the microstructures and geochemistry of minerals.  Her recent work has focused on the role of strain in promoting partial melting in migmatites, and positive feedbacks that exist between partial melting reactions and deformation.

Ms. Crystal Wilson's interests include the formation and evolution of mountain belts, particularly the southern Appalachian Mountains. She is currently using detailed mapping coupled with petrographic analyses to determine the deformational and metamorphic history of Elk Knob and the surrounding region.

 

"Persistent Scatterer InSAR & GPS Horizontal Velocities" map showing line of sight velocity in mm/yr